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witchbat:

a comic i threw together earlier because i’m very stressed out

alpinemastiff:

Michelangelo Antonioni and Federico Fellini at the 1971 Cannes Film Festival

alpinemastiff:

Michelangelo Antonioni and Federico Fellini at the 1971 Cannes Film Festival

johncassavetes:

Harmony Korine on Husbands

"Husbands is like a life experience. There are things in the film that go on for so long it feels like you are dying, and 90% of people would walk out, but, if you maintain it, it becomes more than a film". (x)
All I really want to do is just make films that are fantastic, that just change you, like the way I saw a movie like Husbands when I was a teenager, like Cassavetes’ movie. And I couldn’t even explain to you, when I saw the film I walked out of the film and I didn’t even know what it was, but I knew that I had experienced something. I couldn’t even put it in words what it was, but it was like some strange life experience that had just kind of crept up on me. It’s the most amazing thing you could do. It’s the most amazing thing you could create. (x)
I would rather you feel something than for me to have to explain it to you, intellectualise it. It’s not the way I work. It’s why I love Cassavetes’ films, because they just are, you just feel it. You sit through a movie like Husbands and it’s more than a movie, it’s like a life experience that you’ve just shared with these characters. (x)

johncassavetes:

Harmony Korine on Husbands

"Husbands is like a life experience. There are things in the film that go on for so long it feels like you are dying, and 90% of people would walk out, but, if you maintain it, it becomes more than a film". (x)

All I really want to do is just make films that are fantastic, that just change you, like the way I saw a movie like Husbands when I was a teenager, like Cassavetes’ movie. And I couldn’t even explain to you, when I saw the film I walked out of the film and I didn’t even know what it was, but I knew that I had experienced something. I couldn’t even put it in words what it was, but it was like some strange life experience that had just kind of crept up on me. It’s the most amazing thing you could do. It’s the most amazing thing you could create. (x)

I would rather you feel something than for me to have to explain it to you, intellectualise it. It’s not the way I work. It’s why I love Cassavetes’ films, because they just are, you just feel it. You sit through a movie like Husbands and it’s more than a movie, it’s like a life experience that you’ve just shared with these characters. (x)

breathingvioletfog:

blue-voids:

Grit Kallin Fischer - Self-Portrait with Cigarette, 1928

I love female photographers from the early 20th century who did self portraiture-they’re my heroes

breathingvioletfog:

blue-voids:

Grit Kallin Fischer - Self-Portrait with Cigarette, 1928

I love female photographers from the early 20th century who did self portraiture-they’re my heroes

Possibility (to be able to be) and contingency (to be able not to be) are the operators of subjectification, the point in which something possible passes into existence, giving itself through a relation to an impossibility. Impossibility, as negation of possibility (not [to be able]), and necessity, as negation of contingency (not [to be able not to be]) are the operators of desubjectification, of the destruction and destitution of the subject - that is, processes that, in subjectivity, divide potentiality and impotentiality, the possible and the impossible. The first two constitute Being in its subjectivity, that is, in the final analysis as a world that is always my world, since it is in my world that impossibility exists and touches (contingit) the real. Necessity and possibility, instead, define Being in its wholeness and solidity, pure substantiality without subject - that is, at the limit, a world that is never my world since possibility does not exist in it. Yet modal categories, as operators of Being, never stand before the subject as something he can choose or reject; and they do not confront him as a task that he can decide to assume or not to assume in a privileged moment. The subject, rather, is a field of forces always already traversed by the incandescent and historically determined currents of potentiality and impotentiality, of being able not to be and not being able not to be.
- Giorgio Agamben, Remnants of Auschwitz, pp. 147-148 (via spiritandteeth)